E. Armstrong, ‘Sexual Harassment in the Workplace’

Author: Ellie Armstrong   Sexual harassment can be defined as: “violating a person’s dignity, making them feel inferior or humiliated and consequently creating a hostile or unpleasant environment”[1]. Sexual harassment in the workplace is a widespread issue which has become an expected aspect of the working environment. A survey conducted by the BBC found that…

F. Pennie, ‘Who’s the Mummy? – Surrogacy and Legal Parenthood’

Author: Fraser Pennie Surrogacy is the practice of a woman (the surrogate) becoming pregnant with the intention of handing over that child to the intended parents after the birth. In 2019, the Law Commission and the Scottish Law Commission published their consultation paper, which has reviewed the current legal framework for surrogacy arrangements and proposed…

Glasgow Alumni, ‘Holly McKenna – Research LLM’

As part of one of the Law Review’s projects this year we are undertaking written interviews with various law graduates to showcase the variety of career paths available to law students. For the third edition in this series, we have Holly McKenna, who graduated from the LLB in May and has gone on to pursue…

L. Roughton, ‘Human Data Collection and the Societies of Control ‘

Author: Lloyd Roughton In today’s society, our entire lives are documented and posted online. Our personal data is constantly being recorded in a wide variety of ways, such as applications in our phones, GPS trackers in our cars, and face scanners at airports. This data is compiled, stored and used by governments and corporations for…

Law Review Committee Writing Workshop Notes

Law Review Writing Workshop TOPIC 1 – SUMMATIVE ACADEMIC ESSAYS  To write an academic paper on a topic, you need to have a good understanding of that topic. BOOKS – Books are a great way to get a good overview of the topic – explanation in an objective way. Your topic will likely be on…

C. MacKay, ‘Landmark Jury Research Study Published’

Author: Charlie MacKay The Scottish jury is something of a peculiarity compared with other juries of the common law world. It consists of 15 members (compared with 12 in those jurisdictions normatively closest to ours, such as England and Wales, Ireland, Canada, New Zealand and Australia), and only requires a simple majority of 8:7 for…